28 Sep

Temporary Description for Silent Song

“Whatever it looked like from the outside, there’s only ever been one woman.”—Lex Perry

I had it all. Fame. Fortune. A once-in-ten-lifetimes love with a brilliant, beautiful, battle-scarred goddess. And an addiction that was done sharing my attention. I survived. My fall from grace never stopped fans from throwing money and panties at me. All I lost for my weakness was the heart Gin—the woman, not the booze—took with her when she left.

“His recovery began the moment I walked out of his life. He’s thrived without me.”—Gin Greene

I pushed the man I loved to the brink of death and abandoned him there. Now, I want to exploit his extraordinary talent to boost my career. In his shoes, I’d tell me to go to hell, but Lex charges to my rescue as if he’s been waiting for me to need him. As if there are no hard feelings. As if what I did to him can ever be forgiven.

The old walls between us crumble as our relentless attraction pulls us back together. But he’s not the only man from my past who wants a second shot at me, and that unfinished business could destroy us both…


I may completely trash this before publication, but it’s what I’m working with for placeholder purposes. The Good: It’s within the 200-word limit and hits key points (they used to be together, why it didn’t work last time, why they’re reuniting, and the danger element, which is why I mentioned she has preexisting scars). The Bad: Everything else. Writing descriptions is the worst, and screwing it up can kill a book. But no pressure!

The format nods at a pull-quote scheme I aspired to in the early days of writing this story, which I subsequently abandoned because (a) it was hard to come up with enough of them that were chapter-relevant and (b) I don’t want to interrupt your reading flow with a gimmick. Chapter numbers are practically invisible. Pull quotes make you stop and read and wonder how/if they’re going to matter, and meanwhile, you’ve lost any enthusiasm you had leaving the previous chapter. Since I abandoned it inside, I don’t necessarily love it here.

There are so many wrong impressions to be made at the description stage, I can’t even distinguish legitimate issues from paranoia anymore, so I’ll open the mic to you in regard to my first-person description (I, I, I) concern.

Does a book description written in first person POV make you believe the book's contents are in first person?

  • No (85%, 17 Votes)
  • Yes (15%, 3 Votes)

Total Voters: 20

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UPDATE: Thanks to everybody who participated. Though the results skewed overwhelmingly toward “It’s all good, baby,” the more I thought about it, the more unnecessarily misleading it seemed. Why create a wrong impression for anybody? So I’ve changed it to third person to accurately reflect the POV in the book. If you’re interested, the result is on the Books page.

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